richardberryhill
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Jun 1, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

I have changed, too, and just like you I now walk around listening to music and not the city noises in downtown Oakland. But when walking around, I have the World volume up a bit higher so as not to be smacked by a bike rider or other "thing." 

David S.
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May 16, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

I have been wearing my Hearphones nearly daily at work for over a month since I got them. I work in appliance sales with a national retailer (Think blue shirts and a yellow logo). Prior to having them I would have to keep customers on my left side at all times to understand them and often need to ask them to repeat things. Both problems are all but gone now. For the most part I have gotten more negitive feedback from leadership at the store than from customers. With the leadership after explaining I am using it to compensate for my single side hearing loss it has become accepted as a reasonable accomidation. I have only had a handful of customers who have made a comment or had issue with me wearing them. In these cases I am comfortable with my disability and am more than happy to explain what they are and how they assist me in helping understand them. It's a slight uphill slope but in no way a challenge. 

Community Manager

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

Hi David,

 

It's great to hear how your Hearphones are working for you. Thank you for joining us.

 

I'm glad that you were able to overcome the negative feedback from leadership at the store. A little information can foster understanding. That's great to hear.

 

Thanks,

 

ST

ToddR
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Jun 20, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

When I first bought my hearphones, I sold my Bose Quiet Comfort 25 headphones thinking that these would replace them.  In some situations, they did.  They didn't work as well on airplanes as the QCs did but they worked great for watching television.  However, occassionally I wanted to watch TV and my wife wanted to read and she wanted me to wear headphones to watch TV.  I found a separate device that would pair the hearphones to the TV but the lag was too problematic so they didn't work in this situation either.

I can hear many more things at home and I wear the hearphones regularly.

I am a high school science teacher and I wear them regularly at work.  The students understand why as I've explained them and I hope they notice that I don't have them repeat as often when I'm wearing them.  For people who don't know me, they seem surprised when I answer questions, etc with these on.  I believe they assume I'm using the hearphones to shut out the world when its the exact opposite.

I also wear them most of the time in social situations.  The people that are important to me know what they are and why I do this.  Lots are curious about them and I extol their virtures nearly every time I meet someone new.

I've also purchased the new QC35s and I love them!!

thersites
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Mar 24, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

Yes, I use my Hearphones less often because of 1) embarrassment, 2) disappointing efficacy, 3) the inconvenience of removing them from their case, putting them around my neck, and so forth.

Pacerintl
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Apr 5, 2018

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

Embarrese?, That's ridiculous.
thersites
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Mar 24, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

From the Wirecutter review:

 

"We like the Bose Hearphones, but we don’t think they’re practical for everyday hearing assistance. They sound better than much of the competition and feel comfortable. They’re reasonably priced for a pair, the accompanying app is easy to use, and their battery life is fair (10 hours). However, they look like clunky wireless headphones, and we couldn’t see ourselves using these for listening to people out in the real world."

richardberryhill
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Jun 1, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

You can't be serious! Everything about the Bose Hearphones is great, but you don't like the looks so you would not wear them to overcome hearing loss? Wait until your hearing goes then tell me you're so vain you won't wear a simple and relatively inexpensive device so you can hear again. I lost most of my hearing about age 9 or 10, and it would have been fantastic to have had these available long ago.

 

When your hearing does go, you're looking at thousands of dollars more for hearing aids that are almost as obtrusive and which you will, I guarantee, lose in the first month. Not to mention that, per one pretty capable audiologist, the huge majority of those who sell hearing aids never test to confirm that the purchased hearing aids actually match the curve of your hearing loss, with the result that most hearing aids do not do what they were purchased to do anyway. 

 

Vanity. What a poor excuse. 

promotherobot
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May 4, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

I totally get the look of the Hearphones being bulky but if you act cool about them, everyone else does too. It beats nodding your head to people speaking to you, not having a clue what's being said.

 

One kind of evil/cool thing about Hearphones is that you can listen to a ball game streaming to your phone and no one will know you're doing that. lol. 

thersites
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Mar 24, 2017

Re: Hearphones and Social Cues

I do wear them, but I confess they make me feel self-conscious. And they're not so good as to overcome the resistance.

 

I don't know when you last used hearing aids, but the behind-the-ear ones are much less obtrusive -- they really can't be seen unless you're behind a person and staring at their ear lobes.

 

Your point about "the huge majority of those who sell hearing aids never test to confirm that the purchased hearing aids actually match the curve of your hearing loss" is a bit strange (and surely wrong), given that the Bose can't be tailored at all to one's hearing loss. Does that make the Hearphones better because they can't be misconfigured in that way?

 

The moderator would be the first to tell you that the Hearphones are not for people with significant hearing loss.

 

The Hearphones are good for what they are, and are obviously much less expensive than a really good pair of hearing aids, but I'd like to see evidence that they're as good or almost as good as the latter.