dbdon
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Jan 25, 2017

BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

I have BOSE 901 speakers which have worked great for about 49 years. I recently replaced my Macintosh 1700 receiver with a Yamaha RX381V tuner/amp. The instructions for the 901's say that the equalizer is "required". The only thing the equalizer really appeared to support was an old Superscope 4-track mag tape recorder/player. That device no longer works and I don't intend to replace it. I've connected my Sony CD player to the Yahama receiver, and also used the tuner functions for AM, FM, and BlueTooth and all four of those seem to work very well. The only thing I have left to connect is a new turntable (which I don't have, yet) that will replace a 49-year-old Benjamin Miracord device which has started to have big problems. So, my question is: do I really need the equalizer box, and if so, how do I connect it? What I have seems to work fine without it. THANKS IN ADVANCE for any info!

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Ryan_M
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Dec 13, 2016

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

Thank you for reaching out. The active equalizer is an integral part of the system and is necessary to ensure proper performance of the 901 speakers across the frequency spectrum. While this Yamaha receiver is not compatible with the 901 equalizer, you can find a list HERE with a list of known receivers that are compatible. 

dbdon
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Jan 25, 2017

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

Thank you for replying. I'd like not to have to replace the 901 speakers, as they really produce magnificent sound. Your documentation mentions a few other Yamaha receivers that might work with the equalizer. I got my Yamaha via Amazon Prime, which is very good about exchanges. Unfortunately, none of the models cited in your document are carried by them. It is possible to attach the equalizer via a pre-amp? Do you know of one that would work with Yamaha RX-381V? (I plan to ask the same question to Yamaha.) Thanks in advance for any information.  D. Cameron

Ryan_M
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Dec 13, 2016

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

We love your enthusiasm for the 901 speakers. While there isn't a specific model that we recommend, you could use a separate preamp. You'd have a separate preamp and power amp instead of using a receiver. The preamp would connect to the amplifier input connections on the equalizer and the amplifier output connections would go to the power amp. 

dbdon
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Jan 25, 2017

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required? (Bose Community Subscription Update)

Thanks for the reply – the Optional Connection Guide which you said you would e-mail should help a lot. One last question: the V381 also seems to lack a connection for a turntable. I do want to acquire one in the near future (I have TONS of old vinyl recordings, most in very good condition – including some classical recordings that I used to play somewhat regularly). I understand the requirement is to (pre)amplify the 2-5mV output from the turntable to something like 150mV into the receiver. May the SAME pre-amp that I could use to hook up the equalizer also be used to connect the turntable into the system? (I will ask the same question to Yamaha.)
 
Thanks in advance for any information.
Ryan_M
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Dec 13, 2016

Re: BOSE 901: Is Equalizer Required?

MODERATE NOTE: previous post had been edited after submission

 

Sorry for the confusion dbdon. After submitting the previous post and reviewing the Optional Connections Guide to send, it doesn't appear to explain the preamp/power amp setup. We can explain it in this response. Essentially, the equalizer would serve as a "middle man" between the preamp and power amp. The preamp would connect to the input jacks on the equalizer and the output of the equalizer would connect to the power amp. For use with a turntable, it would be best to use a preamp that has a dedicated phono jack.