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krismarkduthie
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Nov 2, 2020

Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

Hi,

 

I'm currently preparing my living room for the Bose surround speakers 700 and the original plan was to have the speakers on a shelf at the rear of my living room (approx 1m from the sofa) but the actual receivers would be located in the hall cupboard (on the other side of the wall). The speaker cables would then be routed through the wall and hidden behind the shelf.

 

Anyone have any experience of the signal strength being good enough to survive 2 layers of 12.5mm plasterboard? (Plus any objects like the sofa between the Soundbar and the receivers).

 

Thanks,
Kris

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Keith_L
Community Manager

Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

Author Accepted Answer selected by krismarkduthie

Hi Kris,

 

Welcome to the Community, thanks for joining us!

 

This is an interesting setup you are going for, having the receivers in another room on the other side of the wall is something that could work, but does depend on a few factors. 

 

The range of the wireless receivers is up to 9m from the soundbar, and this range can be reduced by obstacles (i.e. walls, doors, pockets, nearby Bluetooth devices, etc.). I know you mentioned having the speakers roughly 1m behind the sofa, but how far away would the receivers be from the soundbar you are connecting them to? As you are putting the receivers behind a wall, you would likely need the soundbar to be closer than the maximum range of 9m to ensure the signal reaches them.

 

Also, if you are going to put the receivers behind a wall, it's going to be very important to limit the chances of other wireless devices interfering with the wireless signal. The most common sources of wireless interference are things like routers, wireless printers, and cordless phone bases, but any wireless device could potentially interfere. You'll want to keep any strong wireless signals at least a meter or two away from the soundbar and receivers, and try not to have the wireless devices between the two. 

 

What I would recommend doing before installing the speakers and cabling in the wall is connect the rear speakers to the soundbar, and take the speakers and receivers into the room you are going to store the receivers in. You can then test playing audio to the rear speakers before drilling any holes in the wall to make sure they do work, 

 

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any further questions!

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5 REPLIES 5
Keith_L
Community Manager

Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

Author Accepted Answer selected by krismarkduthie

Hi Kris,

 

Welcome to the Community, thanks for joining us!

 

This is an interesting setup you are going for, having the receivers in another room on the other side of the wall is something that could work, but does depend on a few factors. 

 

The range of the wireless receivers is up to 9m from the soundbar, and this range can be reduced by obstacles (i.e. walls, doors, pockets, nearby Bluetooth devices, etc.). I know you mentioned having the speakers roughly 1m behind the sofa, but how far away would the receivers be from the soundbar you are connecting them to? As you are putting the receivers behind a wall, you would likely need the soundbar to be closer than the maximum range of 9m to ensure the signal reaches them.

 

Also, if you are going to put the receivers behind a wall, it's going to be very important to limit the chances of other wireless devices interfering with the wireless signal. The most common sources of wireless interference are things like routers, wireless printers, and cordless phone bases, but any wireless device could potentially interfere. You'll want to keep any strong wireless signals at least a meter or two away from the soundbar and receivers, and try not to have the wireless devices between the two. 

 

What I would recommend doing before installing the speakers and cabling in the wall is connect the rear speakers to the soundbar, and take the speakers and receivers into the room you are going to store the receivers in. You can then test playing audio to the rear speakers before drilling any holes in the wall to make sure they do work, 

 

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any further questions!

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krismarkduthie
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Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

Thanks Keith, that's very helpful. The Soundbar would be about 3.9m to the wall, then an additional 135mm to the receivers. This would be sharing a cupboard with the home network gear but the receivers would likely be on the floor and the home network gear would be about 2.5m away (not in-between them). 


I did plan on testing them prior to the drilling to save patching holes, my other option is to have the sockets in the cupboard and feed the power cable through the wall and the receivers recessed on the underside of the shelf. This is all very over complicated for what has been made easy with the wireless installation 😂.

 

Do you know approximately how long the power cables and the speaker cables are?

 

Thanks again for the help.

Kris

Keith_L
Community Manager

Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

No worries Kris, I'm glad I could help!

 

If the receivers are going in a cupboard with your network gear this could easily lead to some interference, but again, the only way to know for sure whether it would work correctly is to test them. Running the power through the wall and leaving the receivers in the main room with the speakers might be the better way to go about this setup. I can see recessing the receivers under the shelves being a fun project!

 

The power cables for the receivers are 1.5m and the cables connecting the receivers to the speakers are 6m. If you need a longer power cord for either of your set up ideas, it's a standard figure of 8 power cord, so you could easily find a longer version of the cord.

 

You'll have to keep me updated on how your setup goes!

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krismarkduthie
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Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

Could you think of any reason the speaker wire couldn’t be extended? I understand one end is proprietary but the other is just bare wires no? 

May end up with signal degradation over longer lengths and the join in the centre. 

as it’s less than 6m from my TV to the rear wall I could run the speaker wires under the floor but I think 6m may be on the limit

Keith_L
Community Manager

Re: Bose Surround Speakers 700 - Signal Strength

You are correct that one end of the cable is bare wires but extending the wires isn't something I would be able to recommend. As you mentioned, it is possible for the signal to degrade the longer you have the wire so extending the wires could be possible to do but it does carry a risk. The surround speakers use an 18 gauge wire to connect the speakers to the receivers, so how far you can extend this would be dependant on the resistance of the wire you used in the extension, and there isn't any way I would be able to guarantee how well it would work. 

 

Given the distances involved, I would personally stick to trying one of the wireless connection options, keeping the receivers closer to the speakers without splicing in more wire as this seems the safest. 

 

If you any further questions, let me know!

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