Chuck
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Mar 29, 2017

Compression

Using a typical PA with all monitors, cables, and speaker problems, I have learned how a compressor can be very helpful on the vocal mix vs headroom etc., yet in all the forums I've read here, compression is not mentioned. I had purchased a unit before getting my PAS and I am getting the impression that I now no longer have a need for it.
I am working on using a guitar effects processor in chan 3/4 and an external reverb/delay on vocal, if needed, as the entire rig. I carry several microphones of different brands to accomodate the various room acoustics (after reading the forums I have purchased an Audix to try), but other than that I should reduce my caravan to backpack so to speak.
I appreciate the forum and all of the responses I have had. Thanks to all! Smile
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thomas-at-bose
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Oct 13, 2003

Re: Compression

Hey Chuck. Nice post.

I used to be a fan of judicious compression (on vocals and horns). But I realized that it was really fix for the problem that was created by all the excessive gear. Once we switched to this new system, all the little rack-mount gizmos are sitting on a shelf awaiting their fate – ebay…. I’ve have found the best (sounding and effective) way to get headroom on vocals is the have the band support the vocalist. With this new technology, it’s really easy. What I always tell the band – “if you can’t hear the vocals, neither can anyone else”. Followed by – “then why are you playing so loud”. I’ve have never got a compelling answer to that question – just miles of headroom. Only had to stop practice a few times, now the behavior of listening to what we are playing is built-in. What a concept…..


Thomas
chuck-at-bose_2
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Nov 2, 2003

Re: Compression

I agree wholeheartedly with Thomas, here. However, I do feel that vocals can sometimes get lost in the mix due to poor mic technique (i.e. backing too far off the mic at the wrong time, dynamically speaking). As a performer and recording/live sound engineer, I've learned to use compression to help reduce the dynamic range in cases like this. I'm anxious to try inserting a compressor on my vocal to see how well it works with our system. I know that too much compression would often lead to excessive feedback in Triple-Amplification applications and I wonder if our system will behave differently. I'll keep you posted with my findings ASAP...