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soundoff92
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Jun 15, 2021

Linking two Pro L1 16's

I have two L1 pro 16 systems. For larger events i want to link them together. 

What is the best method for this. Is it possible to set up as stereo sound? If i bluetooth connect to one will i be able to control volume on both? 

 

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Fish-54
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Aug 1, 2010

Re: Linking two Pro L1 16's

Author Accepted Answer selected by soundoff92

Hello soundoff92,

 

You have a couple of options to link two L1 Pro16 systems, depending on your desired end result.  It also depends on your source material (vocals, instruments, music tracks or some combination of those.) Are you trying to be louder in the same sound field, or spread your sound wider?  Also, you don't mention whether you have a mixer or whether you are plugging your sound source(s) directly into the Pro 16(s).  It would help to know the area you're trying to cover, and the inputs you're using.

 

If you are trying to extend your sound out to the side, or provide coverage to a remote area, the simplest connection is to run an XLRF-to-TRS cable from the Line Out jack on your first Pro16 to one of the channels on your second Pro16.  Be sure to keep the two units at minimum 20 feet apart, to minimize phase cancellation (you can read more about it at this link.)

 

If you are just trying to be louder by having two units side-by-side, you will only get a very modest boost in loudness, and might be more prone to feedback if you link them directly.

 

If you have multiple performers using your L1 Pro16 in a band scenario, try to make sure each performer is only heard through one system.  This allows you to increase the gain-before-feedback, and may allow you to run louder.

 

For stereo sound, you need to feed each Pro 16 a separate signal, usually provided by a stereo mixer like the Bose T4s or T8s, or any number of third-party mixers.

 

The L1 Pro series systems each have two Bluetooth receivers, one signal (the one with  "LE" in the name for "low energy") channel  designed to be connected via the L1 Mix App.  This app lets you adjust the volume, tone, and reverb on your Pro16.  However, it is not a Bluetooth music player.

 

The second Bluetooth receiver (the one without "LE" in the name) is designed to pair with your Bluetooth source.  I do not know if there is a Bluetooth app that can stream one channel (i.e., left or right) to one device and the other channel to a different device.  (Anybody out there know of one?)  If so, you're in business.  Just remember, Bluetooth is a limited-distance, line-of-sight protocol that can be subject to dropouts.  You could get a stereo Bluetooth receiver and run it through a mixer.

 

If your setup doesn't match one of these scenarios, come back and let us know some more specifics.

 

Does that help?

View solution in original post

1 REPLY 1
Fish-54
Mentor
  • 77
  • 291
  • 52
Registered since

Aug 1, 2010

Re: Linking two Pro L1 16's

Author Accepted Answer selected by soundoff92

Hello soundoff92,

 

You have a couple of options to link two L1 Pro16 systems, depending on your desired end result.  It also depends on your source material (vocals, instruments, music tracks or some combination of those.) Are you trying to be louder in the same sound field, or spread your sound wider?  Also, you don't mention whether you have a mixer or whether you are plugging your sound source(s) directly into the Pro 16(s).  It would help to know the area you're trying to cover, and the inputs you're using.

 

If you are trying to extend your sound out to the side, or provide coverage to a remote area, the simplest connection is to run an XLRF-to-TRS cable from the Line Out jack on your first Pro16 to one of the channels on your second Pro16.  Be sure to keep the two units at minimum 20 feet apart, to minimize phase cancellation (you can read more about it at this link.)

 

If you are just trying to be louder by having two units side-by-side, you will only get a very modest boost in loudness, and might be more prone to feedback if you link them directly.

 

If you have multiple performers using your L1 Pro16 in a band scenario, try to make sure each performer is only heard through one system.  This allows you to increase the gain-before-feedback, and may allow you to run louder.

 

For stereo sound, you need to feed each Pro 16 a separate signal, usually provided by a stereo mixer like the Bose T4s or T8s, or any number of third-party mixers.

 

The L1 Pro series systems each have two Bluetooth receivers, one signal (the one with  "LE" in the name for "low energy") channel  designed to be connected via the L1 Mix App.  This app lets you adjust the volume, tone, and reverb on your Pro16.  However, it is not a Bluetooth music player.

 

The second Bluetooth receiver (the one without "LE" in the name) is designed to pair with your Bluetooth source.  I do not know if there is a Bluetooth app that can stream one channel (i.e., left or right) to one device and the other channel to a different device.  (Anybody out there know of one?)  If so, you're in business.  Just remember, Bluetooth is a limited-distance, line-of-sight protocol that can be subject to dropouts.  You could get a stereo Bluetooth receiver and run it through a mixer.

 

If your setup doesn't match one of these scenarios, come back and let us know some more specifics.

 

Does that help?

View solution in original post