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Dec 26, 2019

More than one singer?

Hi, Is it possible to have more than one singer in a L! compact? I want the singers to sound similar, and the guitar line is not the same sound for vocals. Can I add a separate mixer?

 

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Jun 4, 2018

Re: More than one singer?

@boas that’s what most folks do who have multiple vocals and instruments going into whatever flavor of L1 you have. 

The next decision is what mixer meets your needs in terms of number of channels, digital vs analog mixer types etc. You didn’t mention whether you might already have a mixer you are considering using. Bose has their own digital T series of mixers that match up very well with the L1.  But there are numerous other options out there as well.  

As an example, connected to our L1M2 we use a Yamaha MG12X analog mixer with 12 channels which accommodates 2 vocals, 2 acoustic guitars, 1 upright bass, MP3 player for playing music during the breaks, and some additional inputs in case we need to add other instruments. 

With regards to having your singers sound similar, the Yamaha has excellent mic preamps and we use Shure Beta 58A mics for both singers. THis setup has worked very well for us. 

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Re: More than one singer?

Thanks!

I want to use it both for my band and my vocal group with 4 singers a capella. Do you have any suggestions for mixer/mics?

/Bodil

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Sep 13, 2018

Re: More than one singer?

Hi Bodil,

As Cityfolk said, many of us are doing just that. Our band has a pair of L1 Compacts that we run a Soundcraft Signature MTK into (we upgraded from a Mackie ProFX8 to get a few more mic channels and add multitrack recording capability). Both of these mixers are good choices, as is the Yamaha MG Line that Cityfolk has. Allen and Heath, Presonus and Peavey also have decent offerings in the analog realm as well. If you're looking at a pricier (but more featured) digital mixer, you can add Bose, QSC, Roland, Midas and Line6 to the list of small mixers.

The trick with choosing your mixer to to make sure that it has enough mic channels, as often an "8 channel mixer" includes the stereo channels as well and may not have enough mic channels for you. For example, my old Mackie ProFX8 is an 8 channel mixer but only has 4 mic inputs; my current Soundcraft MTK-12 is a 12 channel mixer but only has 8 mic inputs. You can check out pretty much any of these mixers at your local music store to get an idea of what your comfortable with. The general rule of thumb is to figure out how many inputs you need, double it, and add two...and I'm only kind of kidding

Mic-wise, you can also try out many of these at your local store and even get your mic manufacturer to send you some demos to test out, but a lot of the "old standby's" in the $100-$150 range are the Shure SM58 and Beta 58A, Audix OM2 and OM5, and the Sennheiser e835 and e845. There are others from ElectroVoice and Audio Technica but I am not as familiar with their model numbers, although the ElectroVoice 76, 86 and 96 appear to be comparable with their older N/D line that I'm familiar with and like. A couple key points with mics is whether or not they have phantom power requirements (condenser mics, usually pricier) and what kind of pickup pattern they have (omni, cardioid or super/hyper cardioid).

For vocal mics I generally tend to stay with dynamic mics (no phantom power requirement so works with any mixer) and in the case of the Bose L1's, I prefer the super- or hyper-cardioid pickup patterns as they're narrower so have less possibility of feedback from picking up the speakers behind us. The drawback is that you have to be careful of how you hold your mic as the sound drops off quickly as you move it away from your mouth, which means they're not suited to picking up more than one person usually. The other drawback of super- and hyper-cardioid mics is if you have floor monitors in front of you, they should be off to the side as these mics have a pickup "lobe" directly behind the mic (a side effect of narrowing the pickup area in front of the mic) so can feed back easier from loud monitors, but with the L1's I don't think you'll be using floor monitors so that's not an issue.

Hope this helps,
Jeff

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May 10, 2018

Re: More than one singer?

For vocal microphones (for singers with higher quality voices that don't need to be buried), I recommend supercardioid pattern condenser microphones.

They reproduce the actual sound of the singer better than dynamic microphones.

My favorite inexpensive condenser is the AKG C1000S.  This microphone must receive phantom power from the mixer (make SURE your mixer has 48 volt phantom power available) OR can be powered by two AA batteries inside (I use inexpensive EBL rechargeable batteries)...and they don't cost that much more than an SM58.

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May 22, 2019

Re: More than one singer?

Guys ... While we're at it, Mics like the Beta 58a & many other's don't have an on/off switch. I personally like my Mic to have an on/off switch (really imp to me). 

Any pointers/ideas?

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Sep 13, 2018

Re: More than one singer?

Hi Prakash,

Mics that have a switch will generally have a -S or S at the end. Usually they're lower end mics, as most professional sound personnel don't trust the "talent" to remember to turn their mic on when needed, since they would be the ones getting blamed for anything that goes wrong sound-wise

There are some good models, though, such as the Shure SM58S, Sennheiser 835-S, AKG D5-S, Heil PR22-SUT, among others.

Hope this helps,
Jeff

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Re: More than one singer?

AKG C1000S has an on-off switch that's easy to find and use and more resistant to accidentally turning on or off...

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Re: More than one singer?

PS: My C1000S has no problem when run with 18 volt phantom power...

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May 22, 2019

Re: More than one singer?

Jeff K posted:

Hi Prakash,

Mics that have a switch will generally have a -S or S at the end. Usually they're lower end mics, as most professional sound personnel don't trust the "talent" to remember to turn their mic on when needed, since they would be the ones getting blamed for anything that goes wrong sound-wise

There are some good models, though, such as the Shure SM58S, Sennheiser 835-S, AKG D5-S, Heil PR22-SUT, among others.

Hope this helps,
Jeff

Agreed re the "talent" goofing up ... But here this is for me on-stage so I don't have to keep darting towards the Mixer to mute my mic. The Mixer isn't always within arm's reach.

Now that I'd like to use the upper/higher/pro quality mics, i guess my only other option would be to use a cable that supports an in-built switch which can perform this on/off function.

Any ideas/pointers here? Are they good and reliable & any makes/models you'll could suggest?