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Seagullman
Advisor
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Registered since

Dec 13, 2013

Re: Retro 50s style Mics

Hi Liam (hoohaa1),

quote:
I'm luck to have some properly recorded tracks (live big band recordings) from a previous show, and am using them with the Shure Super 55 which looks and sounds the business.

I do however notice feedback. the whole purpose of getting this system was to avoid not only the weight of my old PA, but to use it behind me as a monitor.

I notice if the mic isn't faced away from the PA you get feedback, but also if I try push the volume any higher than may 2/5 on the Bose Trim.


Unfortunately, one of the disadvantages of ca. 180° horizontal dispersion (from left to right - parallel with the floor) is that you do have to take a bit more care regarding feedback. If you know how feedback occurs then ignore the next paragraph.

Feedback occurs when the sound of a source (in your case a microphone) reaches the source again after leaving the loudspeaker/s. This in turn goes through the amplifier, becomes even louder and reaches the source again, goes through the amplifier ... are you getting the idea? This all happens very quickly and eventually you have the squealing which we call feedback (sometimes it's at a lower frequency as with e.g. an acoustic guitar, which can sound like a very loud hum).

To avoid feedback you can do certain things. With an L1 system where the horizontal dispersion is ca. 180° it can quite often help if you angle the microphone upwards so that it is not "looking" directly at the loudspeaker. It's also better to sing as near to the microphone as possible so that you don't have to turn it up as loud (I know that the crooners of old didn't eat the microphone, but they weren't using the volumes that we use today. Another thing that you can try is to make sure that you stand between the microphone and the loudspeaker (shielding the microphone from the L1). What can also help, is to use a Gate on the microphone (a gate is something which only allows a signal to pass through it when a certain - predetermined - volume level has been reached i.e. it would only open when you sing or talk). My experience with combatting feedback is that close-miking is the place to start because you don't have to turn up the mike as much as when you sing from further away. If you can, then let your lips brush the microphone (at least get to within an inch or so of it).

Does that help in any way?

Take care,

Tony
AJ CASALI
Participant
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Mar 10, 2020

Re: Retro 50s style Mics

quote:
I would want the tighter polar pattern of the Shure Super 55 to make it easier control with respect to feedback.


Hi

We bought 2 Shure55H and have had no feedback problem. We would have bought the Super55 but it does ot have an on/off switch which we prefer. ( I know, I know, some prefer "no" on off switch and control on/off with mute on mixer ) The Shure55H takes me back to the 50's with the original sound over the Super55. We love the mic's and also have 2 EV wireless mic's for when we go "outfront" as part of our show. I may add that with proper EQ settings we can make any mic sound close to "any" mic. Just my Opinion.

Aj
ClassEntertainment
"music is neither new or old it just "is"