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Jun 6, 2005

Re: Small corner setup

quote:
Originally posted by docscott:
... I bought a small 2x4 ft. folding table at Sam's for $35 that we used to elevate the stick. It has a sturdy steel frame and plastic top (lightweight and solid). ... also put the bass box on the table next to the stick ...

I want to echo ST's concern; you really should check into the rating of the table. The top itself is probably sturdy enough, but the legs may be a concern after a little use/abuse.

Also, you might want to put a non-slip mat under the B1 when you use it on a table (or other relatively smooth, elevated surface); at louder volumes, the B1's can vibrate quite a bit.

An acoustic comment about the B1 position:

Elevating the B1, in this case, eliminated the objectionable boominess. That's good. However, be aware that the B1 can be a source of feedback, too, if too close to a hot mic -- or an acoustic guitar pickup! An alternative to elevating the B1 would be to move it out of the corner (although you may need to get a longer B1 cable, if you elevate the column that much!).

quote:
...Since we are running only one bass module at this time, I found it lacking when running my Fender Deluxe Jazz bass through the system...

Yea, one B1 just won't generally provide enough bass oomph to balance everything the column is capable of putting out. For any bass instrument, two B1's is pretty much the minimum (even without going to a separate L1 for the bass). It's understandable, when you consider that with a single B1 you only have ~125w of low-end conventional bass sound struggling to match 500w of tailored, unconventional mid-/high-range sound.

quote:
... Given the limited space, the sound worked out great. ... I'm now confident we can make the system work in any setup they throw at us...
Great!
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Mar 3, 2007

Re: Small corner setup

I shared your concern about the sturdiness of a table to elevate the ~100 lb system when I was shopping options. This little table is stronger than it looks in the photos. Although it appears to have just fold out legs with a locking mechanism, this is deceiving. Both legs swing out from an all metal frame that braces the entire perimeter of the table, unlike old folding tables that had the swing out legs that just attach to the tabletop. This gives it much more rigidity than a traditional folded table. We use a bigger version of the same table in our DJ business and it's been a huge improvement as far as being lightweight (due to the plastic top replacing particle board and laminate) and much more stable than the older folding tables we've used.

I looked at several options for elevating the system and this was a nice lightweight, easy to transport option. I would guess it could easily support up to 300 lbs, so it's completely stable with the L1 on it. The only better option would be to build custom stands like those mentioned in an earlier post.

Custom Risers

I will try moving the bass box up front rather than on the table next time and see how that works out. When we had it on the floor behind us in this tight setup previously, the bass was a bit on the boomy side and the overall sound wasn't as good.

I'll let you know how this works. We had another gig Friday night when we opened the live music season at a golf course bar & grill (first time at this venue with the L1). As usual, we got many compliments on our sound compared to last season when we were using our Peavey setup. The L1 wins again!

Scott
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Dec 18, 2006

Re: Small corner setup

Hi Guy's, A little off topic here but how do you get on with that ipod player? It's the Numark Dj isn't it?. I'm looking to reduce the size of my pa yet again but wasn't sure this would be right for me. Do you have to manually pause the system in between each track or is there a facility for that?
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Mar 3, 2007

Re: Small corner setup

Aitch -->

You are right....it's the Numark i-DJ. I've been using it in both my DJ business and also at live gigs to run our backtracks for the past two years. I've got a duplicate playlist of all our backtracks on each i-pod and a separate playlist on each for break music (this is a nice way to fill your breaks with choice recorded cuts).

Having two i-pods gives us an instant backup in case one fails or locks up (we've had this happen!). The i-DJ is a no-frills mixer that allows you to manually cross fade from one i-pod to the other once you've got tracks cued up. Once I got used to using it I started loving it. It's also neat looking with a cool blue back light glow on all the controls. The i-pod controls (including the click wheel) are all duplicated in super size making cuing up a snap. I bought mine for $249 at Guitar Center when it was first released and you can pick them up now for about $149 (Muscians Friend?). I always pay the price as an early adopter, but the attention it drew to us and the comments we got being the first guys around with one of these was worth it!

You do have to manually pause between tracks, but the button is large enough to easily hit. I often set up two backtracks (one on each i-pod) and then use the crossfader to start the next one that's cued up. This cuts your time between backtracks to a minimum.

I highly recommend this little unit - it does everything we need it to at a reasonable price.

--> Scott
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Oct 27, 2006

Re: Small corner setup

Does it let you adjust the volume on the iPods individually, and can you preview the volume through head phones. I have the biggest complaints about the change in volume on the different tracks that I have uploaded to iTunes from my CD's??
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Mar 3, 2007

Re: Small corner setup

Gordy,

You can adjust each i-pod independantly with a volume slider control on each side. There is one headphone jack that matches the master out from the mixer. We have the same volume variation problem that you mentioned because we record our backtracks on two different home recording systems and sometimes years apart. Keeping recording volume steady from all sources is near impossible. You can use the soundcheck function on your i-pods to equalize the volume on all tracks, but the inherent compression in signal makes the tracks sound thinner.

Rather than limit the dynamic range of the backtracks, we came up with a great solution. We run the line outs from the i-pod mixer into a volume pedal and then from the volume pedal into the L1. This gives you volume control with a foot pedal while you're playing. For some songs, I'll even vary the volume of the backtrack to enhance sections of the songs (during lead or other instrumental breaks). It really helped our sound balance and it's great to have total control over the backtrack volume without taking your hands off your guitar!

Scott
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Oct 27, 2006

Re: Small corner setup

Thanks for the heads up on the volume pedal, I have one that I rarely use, and now have a great place for it.

Thanks,