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Oct 27, 2017

SB Three-Chord Chime

This support buttelin (including sample files) describes how to use ControlSpace Designer to create a three-chord chime.

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May 20, 2020

Re: SB Three-Chord Chime

Smart design. Was waiting for something like this for a long time.

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Jul 20, 2020

Re: SB Three-Chord Chime

This is indeed a very usefull item. I have added an additionel 4th Chord and make it count upwards. Just add 400Hz + 800Hz + 1200Hz and set the delay/Start chord 4 at 600msec instead of 300.

Maybe someone has an idea about how to make an contact output high for the duration of the chime. Obviously this can be done by logic with the EX models. To do this with a ESP processor it will be difficult, if not impossible.

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Re: SB Three-Chord Chime

Hello Stephan,

With the ControlSpace ESP (no logic) you can only program the GPO in a Pset, but you cannot invoke it using metering (or something like that).

If you have a spare output, you might can route the chime signal to that output and use a voice activated relais like the RDL ST-VOX1.

 

BR
Arno

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Re: SB Three-Chord Chime

Hello Arno,

 

Yesterday we have altered the Three Chord Chime design. The use of multiple delays, duckers en sine generators utilizes a substantial amount of DSP processing capacity. We put in a multichannel delay that occupies less DSP capacity than 5 separate delay blocks.

By adding a 4th chime and a router you can even make a choice between 1, 2, 3 or 4 tones, set the sounding order and even duck a microphone signal whilst the chime sounds.

If you use a sine generator (like a 500Hz that is also needed for making a chord), and sent this signal trough a delay set at 300 msec. + a gate. This results in a pulsating sine output at approximately 2 Hz.

Set the gain for this output at +6dB, use a simple bridge rectifier (or 4 separate diodes) and feed the output to it. This results in a DC output of approximately 1,7 Volts. More than sufficient to blink a standard LED during chiming. Leave out the additional delay (not the gate), and you have a continuous signal during chiming. If you want to switch a relay at 12 or 24 VDC, you can add an optocoupler or use a small transistor.

The best thing is that the chime really sounds good and you can tune it the way you like.

 

Regards,

 

Stephan